Slabber Apiculture News www.pollination.co.za Latest products and services news. en-za beekeeping blog Join, participate or just read updates on products and the wonderful environment we live in on the new blog. 25 2011-05-23 08:19:16 [News Item #25]   beekeeping blog
2011-05-23 08:19:16

Join, participate or just read updates on products and the wonderful environment we live in on the new blog.


Go to www.pollination.co.za/wordpress or follow the link from the menu.




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Radio Interview Listen to a radio interview with Frans Slabber (owner/operator) of Slabber Apiculture on beekeeping as a hobby. 24 2009-08-21 09:32:28 [News Item #24]   Radio Interview
2009-08-21 09:32:28

Listen to a radio interview with Frans Slabber (owner/operator) of Slabber Apiculture on beekeeping as a hobby.


Tune into RSG(Radio Sonder Grense) on Monday 24th August between 09h00 and 10h00 SAST ( GMT+02h00 ). The program is called "Oggend op RSG" ( Morning on RSG ). For those of you living overseas, that can understand Afrikaans, you can also listen live on the internet at this link.






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5-Frame Trap Hives High quality, lightweight 5-frame trap hives produced. 23 2009-08-20 16:18:12 [News Item #23]   5-Frame Trap Hives
2009-08-20 16:18:12

High quality, lightweight 5-frame trap hives produced.


We have produced a quality trap hive that will last quite a few seasons and is light enough for easy handling. The weight is crucial especially when removing that precious swarm from a tree at the top of a high ladder. Although the hive is lightweight the s-shaped corner struts, made from solid pine, give the hive structural strength. Additionally each hive comes with a small satchel of old propolis that may be heated and applied to the top of the frames to lure passing swarms.

  • Constructed from 12mm French imported marine 7-ply ( BS1088 & Lloyds Standard )
  • Reinforced corner solid pine struts
  • Glued with Balcotan 100 waterproof, UV resistant glue
  • Coated with raw linseed & beeswax mixture
  • Inner lid with ventilation spacers on top and outer galvanized steel lid
  • Made to Blue Book standard frame measurements and bee spaces
  • 5 x 32mm brood frames #baf-32-0000
  • Frames are wired and contain a 45mm strip of beeswax foundation
  • Sold with plastic satchel of propolis for application to frame top bars as attractant


price : R450.00

Contact Slabber Apiculture for availability and ordering.






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Researchers reveal how a queen bee's perfume helps her hold sway in the hive. Researchers reveal how a queen bee's perfume helps her hold sway in the hive. 22 2009-08-01 10:10:18 [News Item #22]   Researchers reveal how a queen bee's perfume helps her hold sway in the hive.
2009-08-01 10:10:18

Researchers reveal how a queen bee's perfume helps her hold sway in the hive.


In an exciting revelation that has potential implications for the apicultural industry, as well as for brain research, University of Otago researchers have succeeded in unravelling one of the mysteries that surround the honey bee queen's ability to control the behaviour of her workers.

Department of Zoology staff at the University of Otago two years ago discovered that queen bees manipulate their offspring's behaviour by releasing a pheromone that blocks aversive learning in young bees.

Professor Alison Mercer and Dr Kyle Beggs, in a paper just published in the international journal Current Biology, have now identified the molecular target of this pheromone. Queen pheromone — or more specifically a significant component of it, called homovanillyl alcohol or HVA — activates just one of three honey bee dopamine receptors, altering dopamine signalling in the brain and, consequently, the behaviour of young bees.

One of HVA's effects is to curb young bees' aversive learning ability (their ability to store the memory of unpleasant experiences in the brain and, consequently, to predict punishment). Why does the queen do this? Her pheromones have unpleasant effects; they impair motor activity and block worker ovary development. Preventing young bees from developing aversive memories against the queen's odours ensures young bees continue to tend the queen — thus safeguarding the future of the queen and, ultimately, the colony.

“Evolution has provided queen bees with a chemical that selectively blocks aversive learning but leaves reward learning intact,” says Professor Mercer. “Two years ago we identified which chemical was responsible for these effects, and now we have discovered how the chemical works.”

Establishing a link between changes at the behavioural level and events at a cellular and molecular level is generally very difficult because the processes underlying events such as learning and memory are complex.

“This is an important breakthrough because it will help us understand more clearly how memories are formed, and how brains tell the difference between memories that predict punishment and memories that predict reward.”

“There is a great deal of evidence now that mechanisms underlying learning and memory are common to many species, and that important brain chemicals such as dopamine operate in very similar ways in vertebrate and invertebrate animals.”

Professor Mercer and Dr Beggs are now starting to explore the effects of queen pheromone on vertebrate dopamine receptors. They are also establishing links with other researchers working on vertebrate systems to try to determine whether queen pheromone/HVA has potential for use in neurological research, as the importance of dopamine in brain function is widely recognized, if not fully understood.

Furthermore, with synthetic queen pheromones already in use as a tool for controlling queenless hives, Mercer believes their research findings could be applied in apiculture. Equally the insight they have provided into queen bee survival mechanisms could prove useful to efforts aimed at halting the current dramatic worldwide decline in honey bee populations, especially in countries like New Zealand which rely heavily on honey bees for crop pollination.






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AFB in South Africa Meeting to be held at the Agricultural Research Institute in Stellenbosch, Western Cape, to discuss the current status and future direction of managing this new disease in South Africa. 21 2009-07-24 08:25:45 [News Item #21]   AFB in South Africa
2009-07-24 08:25:45

Meeting to be held at the Agricultural Research Institute in Stellenbosch, Western Cape, to discuss the current status and future direction of managing this new disease in South Africa.


The venue has been confirmed for a meeting at Stellenbosch on the 25 July at the ARC Conference Room. I know that this is short notice but feel that the importance of the meeting warrants some concessions in this regard. I think most of us are becoming so busy that any delay will only make the meeting more difficult to attend. In addition it is the last weekend that Neil Farrer will be available to speak to an audience of South African Beekeepers. It will also follow closely on a meeting in Pretoria with Government so I hope as many who are available will attend. Attached are the New Zealand regulation and management strategy and Mike's document. It will help if you have read these before the meeting. Tea at Honeywood on Thursday 2.30 remains an opportunity for those further away from Cape Town to chat to Neil.

A suggested Agenda for Saturday as follows:
  • 9.30 - Welcome
  • 9.45 - Neil Farrer to talk about how AFB is managed in New Zealand
  • 10.15 - Mike Allsopp - his working document - 'The road -map.'
  • 10.45 - break for tea.
  • 11.00 - Open discussion on Industry strategy.
  • 13.00 - Close





Copyright © Slabber Apiculture 2007. All Rights Reserved.
homepage www.pollination.co.za ]]>
New Website Launched Slabber Apiculture is proud to display its new look site 20 2009-07-12 14:53:39 [News Item #20]   New Website Launched
2009-07-12 14:53:39

Slabber Apiculture is proud to display its new look site


Slabber Apiculture has a new look, but not only that, our business has expanded and we now offer more products as well as beekeeping produce such as honey, propolis tincture and beeswax furniture cream.

The beekeeping forum is due for an overall, as is the ApiaryNet functionality. So keep an eye out for updates there.

And finally, a word of support for everyone affected by AFB in the the Cape.


Happy winter maintenance.
Frans




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homepage www.pollination.co.za ]]>
Honey Contamination Examples Contamination of honey by chemicals applied to protect honeybee combs from wax-moth (Galleria mellonela L.) 19 2007-04-10 07:49:46 [News Item #19]  Honey Contamination Examples
2007-04-10 07:49:46

Contamination of honey by chemicals applied to protect honeybee combs from wax-moth (Galleria mellonela L.)


An article that illustrates the contamination of honey by pesticides and possibly highlights the need for "organic" honey?

From: Food Additives & Contaminants, Volume 23, Number 2/February 2006

Greek honey was monitored during a three-year surveillance program for residues of chemicals used to protect honey-bee combs from wax-moth. A total of 115 samples purchased from stores (commercial samples) and 1060 samples collected from beekeepers (bulk samples) were analysed for 1,4-dichlorobenzene (p-DCB), 1,2-dibromoethane (DBE) and naphthalene. A purge & trap-gas chromatograph-mass spectrometer system was used for the analysis. During the first year of the study, 82.9% of the commercial samples had residues of p-DCB that exceeded the established limit of 10?µg?kg-1, whilst during the second year 53.6% and during the third 30% exceeded the limit. The percentage of beekeepers samples that had more than 10?µg?kg-1 decreased from 46.6 to 34.7% and 39.8% respectively during the three consecutive years of analysis. Only one commercial sample (0.8%) had residues of DBE that exceeded 10?µg?kg-1 during the three years study, while 9.9% of the beekeepers samples exceeded this limit in 2003. This percentage fell to 1.9 and 2.8% during the following years. Naphthalene was found in more commercial samples than in samples from beekeepers during the first year, but decreased to similar levels during the next two years. Honeys that are produced earlier in the season are more contaminated those produced later.






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ApiaryNet : Apiary Management Software Manage your apiary records online. 18 2007-04-05 08:51:58 [News Item #18]  ApiaryNet : Apiary Management Software
2007-04-05 08:51:58

Manage your apiary records online.


Go to ApiaryNet and follow the link to registration.

.:What is it?:. ApiaryNet is a web-based system that will firstly allow individual beekeepers to manage their beekeeping operation. Secondly, ApiaryNet will allow members of beekeeping groups to access apiary location information and view apiary distribution in a particular area.

.:Get Started:. Add landowners to your ApiaryNet selecting the \'Contacts\' option. On the contacts page, press \'+ Add New\' on the displayed table, fill in the required fields and press \'Create\'. Then select the \'Apiaries\' option and add apiaries in the a similar manner to adding contacts. Some information are required and such information is indicated by a red asterisk. You may at any time update or delete information.
Note: You will not be able to delete yourself as a landowner/beekeeper, you will only be allowed to change your information.
Download Google Earth and install the application. This is free. Press the Google Earth button above to view your apiaries\' locations.

.:Features:.

  • Manage your own apiaries in terms of individual swarms with complete record keeping, queen genetic lines and pollination contracts.
  • One click automated export of apiary coordinates to Google Earth.
  • View apiaries belonging to different associations provided you are a registered member of that association.

.:Benefits:.

  • Secure storage of your information and records, accessible from anywhere via a web browser.
  • Possible pest control usage to establish varroa free zones by agricultural institutions.
  • Distribution information may be utilized for planning and research purposes.






Copyright © Slabber Apiculture 2007. All Rights Reserved.
homepage www.pollination.co.za ]]>
Apiculture Forum Apiculture related www forum created. 17 2007-03-08 12:06:45 [News Item #17]  Apiculture Forum
2007-03-08 12:06:45

Apiculture related www forum created.


New blogging(message board) forum, hosted by Slabber Apiculture, created to discuss apiculture related topics. A general topic message board forum for discussing "interesting" stuff such as "global climate change" also available. Please feel free to join.

Go to -> http://www.pollination.co.za/forum/index.php






Copyright © Slabber Apiculture 2007. All Rights Reserved.
homepage www.pollination.co.za ]]>
Website updated New content has been added to the products, market and contact pages. 16 2007-03-07 09:43:51 [News Item #16]  Website updated
2007-03-07 09:43:51

New content has been added to the products, market and contact pages.


New product listing with photos and pricing available on the products page. One honey producer in Albertinia, South Cape, South Africa added to market page. Contact details updated - its becoming a family business!






Copyright © Slabber Apiculture 2007. All Rights Reserved.
homepage www.pollination.co.za ]]>
New Market Place Slabber Apiculture website offers free advertising for small farmers/manufacturers. 15 2006-12-14 21:29:53 [News Item #15]  New Market Place
2006-12-14 21:29:53

Slabber Apiculture website offers free advertising for small farmers/manufacturers.


Small yield honey producers and manufacturers of bee related equipment can now list their products on the "market" page. This is a free service to the beekeeping community and will hopefully promote the sale of 100% South African products and produce.

It will also expose small honey producers to a wider market. The only requirement is that you are the producer, no resellers please. This is a free service and I reserve the right to accept or deny a product.

Please feel free to contact me if you feel you qualify and have the desire to be listed on the market page.

Commercial pollinators may also contact me to have their services listed.






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homepage www.pollination.co.za ]]>
New Langstroth Brood Hives First brood hive enclosures available. 14 2006-12-04 00:16:16 [News Item #14]  New Langstroth Brood Hives
2006-12-04 00:16:16

First brood hive enclosures available.


Brood hive enclosures for sale - Please view the products section of this site which will continuously be updated as new products become available.

All products handmade by Frans B Slabber and subject to stringent quality control. Only source materials of the best quality are used in the manufacturing of these hives.

The latest international research in hive making were incorporated into the design of the hives. The hives are built according to Voges (1983) dimensions as adopted by the South African Federation of beekeepers' Associations.

.




Copyright © Slabber Apiculture 2007. All Rights Reserved.
homepage www.pollination.co.za ]]>
The Glycemic Index of Honey A preliminary assessment of the glycemic index of honey and the effect of different flower nectar on it. 13 2006-11-01 22:00:31 [News Item #13]  The Glycemic Index of Honey
2006-11-01 22:00:31

A preliminary assessment of the glycemic index of honey and the effect of different flower nectar on it.


This article is a publication by the Australian government and relates, in so far as honey types are concerned, to Australia. The article however, has broader interest, as it gives a concise summary of the nutritional value of honey, its composition and a good background on what the glycemic index actually is.

As a summary, here are some excerpts from article that may be of general interest.

Honey contains more than 180 identified substances but consists mainly of sugars with the remainder consisting of flavouring materials, minerals, acids, enzymes and pigments. In most honeys, the monosaccharide fructose predominates with lesser amounts of glucose occurring. In addition there are at least another 12 disaccharides (sugars) in honey.

Acids make up 0.5% of the total honey solids and contributes to the flavour.

A 100g serving of honey supplies 1320 kilojoules of energy compared to 100g of table sugar (sucrose) which contains 1600 kilojoules of energy.

Honey contains small amounts of minerals and vitamins and they are of little significance due to their small quantities.

Invertase is the most significant enzyme as it is added by the honeybee and splits the sucrose into constituent sugars and produces more complex ones.

Results of tests on subjects indicate that there is a significant variation in the glycemic index (GI) depending on the source of the honey. In other words, honey can be classified as a low, moderate or high GI food depending on the source.

Download the complete article in pdf format.

.




Copyright © Slabber Apiculture 2007. All Rights Reserved.
homepage www.pollination.co.za ]]>
Oldest Bee Fossil Discovered Perfectly preserved in amber, the fossil was discovered in Burma. The specimen has been dated at approximately 100 million years. 12 2006-10-25 21:13:39 [News Item #12]  Oldest Bee Fossil Discovered
2006-10-25 21:13:39

Perfectly preserved in amber, the fossil was discovered in Burma. The specimen has been dated at approximately 100 million years.


The fossil bee shows a mixture of modern wasp and bee characteristics, supporting current theories on the honeybee evolutionary path. Experts believe pollen-dependent bees arose from carnivorous wasp ancestors. Concurrent with this discovery, scientists have also completed mapping of the honeybee DNA. The DNA shows striking links with mammals and humans, according to researchers.


Fossil bee in amber - Melittosphex burmensis.

Read the complete article at the BBC Nature page.




Copyright © Slabber Apiculture 2007. All Rights Reserved.
homepage www.pollination.co.za ]]>
5-Frame Trap Hives Produced Pollination has started manufacturing its first hive box product, for the trapping of swarms. 11 2006-08-27 22:43:22 [News Item #11]  5-Frame Trap Hives Produced
2006-08-27 22:43:22

Pollination has started manufacturing its first hive box product, for the trapping of swarms.


These handmade, bright orange, 5-frame trap hives ( nucleus boxes ) are for sale. They are ideal for capturing absconding wild swarms, that are in the process of establishing a new colony. The box is designed for the standard Langstroth frame and is sold with 5 frames ( half waxed ). With proper care, this trap hive will give years of service.

Features:-
  • standard Langstroth format brood frames
  • galvanzed iron stand that can accommodate both a trap hive and a brood hive, sold separately ( badger deterrent )
  • 22mm thickness, solid pine construction
  • each box hand built
  • galvanized lid with wooden inner
  • triple coated with PVA paint mixed with algicide and fungicide
  • waterproof woodglue ( Balcotan 100 ) - no nails
  • frames fitted with half a strip of wax foundation
  • frames fitted with eyelets

5-frame trap hives.

Sample brood frame - half waxed.

For more information such as pricing and availability, contact pollination.




Copyright © Slabber Apiculture 2007. All Rights Reserved.
homepage www.pollination.co.za ]]>
Klein Karoo Snow Photographs Some landscape photos of my recent trip through the Klein Karoo. 10 2006-07-26 00:00:00 [News Item #10]  Klein Karoo Snow Photographs
2006-07-26 00:00:00

Some landscape photos of my recent trip through the Klein Karoo.



Swart Berge, View on the way from George to Knysna.

Huisrivier Pass outside Calitzdorp, on the way to Ladismith.

Homestead near Ladismith, Seweweeks Poort.

Rock formations between Montagu and Ashton.





Copyright © Slabber Apiculture 2007. All Rights Reserved.
homepage www.pollination.co.za ]]>
Bibby's Hoek Kloofing With Otto in the Homtini indigenous forest. 9 2006-07-13 00:00:00 [News Item #9]  Bibby's Hoek Kloofing
2006-07-13 00:00:00

With Otto in the Homtini indigenous forest.



Darkside of the gorge.

Prehistoric animal in its natural environment.





Copyright © Slabber Apiculture 2007. All Rights Reserved.
homepage www.pollination.co.za ]]>
Wolwerivier Rock Rock climbing near Rondevlei with Otto, Jesaja, Kito and Debbie. 8 2006-07-11 00:00:00 [News Item #8]  Wolwerivier Rock
2006-07-11 00:00:00

Rock climbing near Rondevlei with Otto, Jesaja, Kito and Debbie.



Top of the crag.

Ready to abseil.

Otto contemplate the depths.

Jesaja showing the way.

The Wolwerivier.





Copyright © Slabber Apiculture 2007. All Rights Reserved.
homepage www.pollination.co.za ]]>
Drupkelders Hiking Hiking down to the Homtini river through the forest near Knysna. Good kloofing potential. 7 2006-07-10 00:00:00 [News Item #7]  Drupkelders Hiking
2006-07-10 00:00:00

Hiking down to the Homtini river through the forest near Knysna. Good kloofing potential.



Psychedelic stalagmite.

Rock pool.

Frans and faithful hound Hercules.

A good topping of foam.

Rockface texture.





Copyright © Slabber Apiculture 2007. All Rights Reserved.
homepage www.pollination.co.za ]]>
Salt River Crags Rock climbing with Otto at the crags outside Plettenberg Bay(South Africa) near the Kurland Brick works. 6 2006-07-09 00:00:00 [News Item #6]  Salt River Crags
2006-07-09 00:00:00

Rock climbing with Otto at the crags outside Plettenberg Bay(South Africa) near the Kurland Brick works.



Otto staring out over gorge.

Top of the climb, pondering a descent?

Looking down the climb.

River below.





Copyright © Slabber Apiculture 2007. All Rights Reserved.
homepage www.pollination.co.za ]]>